Friday, December 4, 2020

Did You Know?

The Historian Livy’s Greatest Fan Reportedly Traveled From Spain To See The Famous Scholar In Italy

Titus Livius (better known as Livy, c. 59 BCE- 17 CE), one of the most famous writers from ancient Rome, came from a prominent...

The Pointed Origin Tale For The Samnite Name

The so-called Samnites were an ancient federation of Oscan-speaking tribes that controlled a large territory around the Apennine Mountain range in Central Italy. At...

The Tale Of Ning Cheng’s Dramatic Downfall And Resurgence In Ancient China

Ning Cheng was an ancient Chinese government official who began his career during the reign of Emperor Jing (r. 157-141 BCE). He steadily ascended...

The Odd Myth Of Semiramis’ Army Of Fake Elephants

Semiramis was a legendary and mythologized figure whose tales likely were built around the historical Assyrian Queen Sammu-Ramat, who held power as a regent...

Kublai Khan Allegedly Had At Least 47 Sons

Kublai Khan, the preeminent leader of the Mongol dominions of his time, made his bid for power in 1260, militarily fending off his ambitious...

The Legend Of Narses’ Buried Treasure

Narses (c. 480-574) began his career as a eunuch who served the emperors of Constantinople as an imperial guardsman and agent. He piqued the...

That Time When A King’s Cloak Saved A Boy From Sickness

King Guntram of Burgundy (r. 561-593) was a man who generally acted in a good-natured and benevolent manner. Of course, as a medieval monarch,...

The Deadly Overextension of Chramnichis Against The Lombards

After suffering several raids from the Lombards between 570 and 575, the Frankish King Guntram of Burgundy (r. 561-593) decided to take preventative action...

The Origin Story Of The Nez Percé Tribe Name

The Nez Percé tribe, which now calls itself the Nimiipuu people, are a sovereign Native American nation that once held extensive territory in the...

Weather Saved The City Of Kokura From An Atomic Blast

In the early morning of August 9, 1945, a B-29 Superfortress named “Bockscar” lifted off from Tinian, in the Northern Marianas Islands, and began...

The Story Of The Poetic Protest Graffiti Left On Hernan Cortes’ Walls

Dividing wealth among treasure-hunters is often a tense task, prone to arguments and suspicion, but relationships in such situations can become especially strained when...

Bernal Díaz’s Graphic Account Of The Human Sacrifice Of His Friends

Bernal Díaz del Castillo was an experienced conquistador who served on several Spanish voyages around Yucatan and Mexico, including the expedition of Hernan Cortes...

Latest Articles

Kublai Khan Allegedly Had At Least 47 Sons

Kublai Khan, the preeminent leader of the Mongol dominions of his time, made his bid for power in 1260, militarily fending off his ambitious...

The Legend Of Narses’ Buried Treasure

Narses (c. 480-574) began his career as a eunuch who served the emperors of Constantinople as an imperial guardsman and agent. He piqued the...

The Historian Livy’s Greatest Fan Reportedly Traveled From Spain To See The Famous Scholar In Italy

Titus Livius (better known as Livy, c. 59 BCE- 17 CE), one of the most famous writers from ancient Rome, came from a prominent...

That Time When A King’s Cloak Saved A Boy From Sickness

King Guntram of Burgundy (r. 561-593) was a man who generally acted in a good-natured and benevolent manner. Of course, as a medieval monarch,...

The Pointed Origin Tale For The Samnite Name

The so-called Samnites were an ancient federation of Oscan-speaking tribes that controlled a large territory around the Apennine Mountain range in Central Italy. At...

The Tale Of Ning Cheng’s Dramatic Downfall And Resurgence In Ancient China

Ning Cheng was an ancient Chinese government official who began his career during the reign of Emperor Jing (r. 157-141 BCE). He steadily ascended...

The Deadly Overextension of Chramnichis Against The Lombards

After suffering several raids from the Lombards between 570 and 575, the Frankish King Guntram of Burgundy (r. 561-593) decided to take preventative action...

The Tale Of Saint Olaf’s Fiery Conversion Of The Lake Vangsmjøse Region

Despite being posthumously labeled as a saint, King Olaf II of Norway (r. 1015-1028) rarely acted saintly. He gained his title of sainthood due...

The Odd Myth Of Semiramis’ Army Of Fake Elephants

Semiramis was a legendary and mythologized figure whose tales likely were built around the historical Assyrian Queen Sammu-Ramat, who held power as a regent...

The Bizarre Medieval Tale Of A Miraculous Spiritual Leader Who Was Assassinated By A Bishop

In the 6th century, an intriguing figure was born in the vicinity of Bourges, in central Gaul (now France). His name, unfortunately, has been...
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